Facebook Graph Search: A Case Study

Yesterday Facebook removed me from the waiting list and added Graph Search to my profile. I attended the press conference launch (via live blogging) and have certainly heard the hype, so I was anxious to try this new tool.

Recently, I’ve become interested in oils in order to make more natural versions of beauty and cleaning supplies. I began typing in oils, and results began filling in below the search box. I love the auto complete feature as it lets you modify your search term in real time to receive better results.

Facebook Graph Search

Initial results included a blog, book, website and holistic beauty supply store in MN. The only initial search result that didn’t apply was Oils Moto Club, which was labeled Automobile and Parts so I knew it wasn’t worth clicking on (if the name didn’t give it away to begin with).

Upon pulling up the Herbs & Oils World Facebook page, I had multiple options to locate more information on it.

Facebook Graph Search

I discovered that I had one friend who liked the page and pulled up several non-friends who did as well. I noticed that some were in my area although I’m not sure what criteria are given the most weight here.

The point is that you can easily gather personal feedback on your search results, which differentiates Facebook Graph from web search engines.

Naturally, privacy concerns arise. Do you want the world to be able to find you in Graph Search? Or even be able to see that you like or engage with specific pages? Facebook has made great strides in simplifying its privacy settings, but some still find them cumbersome and/or confusing. If you’re not sure, check out Graph Search Privacy to better understand what people can find out about you with this new tool.

Feedback

I’m excited about the possibilities of Facebook Graph Search for everyday living as well as for my company. There appear to be some intriguing possibilities for landing new clients, locating new resources and connecting with like-minded individuals.

As always, privacy is a concern, so you need to review your settings. Take a few minutes to understand what others can see when they search for you on Graph Search (and online in general).

This shouldn’t stop you from jumping in and utilizing this new tool though. One of the biggest benefits of technology is connecting people and resources, and I see Facebook Graph Search moving this cause forward.

What about you? Have you used Graph Search yet? What are your thoughts and/or experiences?

Are you confused? Drop me a line and I’d be happy to help you out. Below I’ve listed some additional resources on the subject as well.

Happy searching!
Jaime

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