Take A Closer Look at LinkedIn To Grow Your Business

Are you using LinkedIn to expand your professional network and grow your business?

LinkedIn is moving into the spotlight with marketers.

LinkedIn is ready for its closeup, and marketers are taking notice.

LinkedIn tends to be the forgotten social network. Most people go one of two ways: set up a profile and forget about it or link it to their Twitter account, flooding their professional network with random bits of information. We don’t recommend either.

Related reading: LinkedIn: Are You Connected?

It was interesting to see LinkedIn’s presence on the recently published Social Media Marketing Industry Report by Social Media Examiner. The professional social network came in an impressive third (behind Facebook and Twitter) as marketers’ most used social platform.

LinkedIn is the 3rd most popular social network for marketers.

LinkedIn came in a close third as the most popular social network for marketers.
(Source: Social Media Marketing Industry Report)

But are marketers setting and forgetting or actually using the network? We’re going with the latter. LinkedIn came in (a distant) second to Facebook as the most important social platform for marketers, if they could only choose one, and that sentiment is growing. Twenty-one percent of marketers selected the professional network as their most important platform, up from 17% in 2014. And LinkedIn’s status in business-to-business (B2B) marketing is even more dominant. Forty-one percent of B2B marketers designated the professional network as their most important platform, even outpacing Facebook.

Will this trend continue? CCC thinks so. Sixty-six percent of marketers surveyed plan on increasing their usage of LinkedIn in the future, narrowly finishing third behind Twitter and YouTube. And we do mean narrowly: the top three networks in this category were all within one percent.

What’s sparked the interest in LinkedIn? The network has made changes to encourage business professionals to return on a more regular basis, including opening LinkedIn Publishing to all members and re-engineering LinkedIn Search.

Related reading: Get Your Ducks In A Row: Your 1st Quarter Social Media Updates

How can you tap into the power of the largest professional social network in the world? Review our series on how to make the most of your efforts, including growing your professional network, rocking your profile and making LinkedIn Groups work for you.

What’s your favorite LinkedIn feature?

How regularly do you visit the platform?

Where does LinkedIn rank in your order of most important social platforms?

Let us know if you have any questions or would like some help tapping into the wealth of possibility on this platform.

Let’s connect!
Jaime

Let’s chat (about the SMM Industry Report, LinkedIn or otherwise):
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Get Your Ducks In A Row: Your 1st Quarter Social Media Updates

Social media is an ever-evolving world. One of our most popular posts last year was Social Media 2014: Traveling At The Speed of Light (And A Look Ahead!), so we thought that a quick first quarter review of social media updates would help you stay up-to-date. Here goes!

Your Q1 social media updates brought to you by CCC (and Webster)!

Social media’s like a day at the ballpark. You never know what you’re going to find! A duck wearing shades?!

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Pinterest

LinkedIn


Get Social

What important updates did we miss?

What’s your favorite social media update thus far in 2015?

What’s your favorite social network right now?

Remember, we’re ready to help you navigate the always evolving, real-time social media world to achieve your specific objectives. Want to talk?

Let’s get social,
Jaime

Join the conversation: 
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Social Media 2014: Traveling At The Speed of Light (And A Look Ahead!)

Social media. This ever-changing, real-time world is unbelievable — both in the marketing opportunity it presents and in trying to stay on top of the constant changes. Are you utilizing the new features that popped up in 2014? Let’s take a quick look back…

Social media travels at the speed of light

Facebook

Twitter

  • Start a conversation: share a tweet through direct messages (read more)
  • Tag people in a photo / add multiple photos to one tweet (read more)
  • Twitter offers you more control over your feed (read more)
  • Would you sell directly in Twitter? (read more)
  • What’s next? Ask the head tweeters.
From rags to riches: Brian Acton

Facebook didn’t turn him down this time. Brian Acton, co-founder of Instagram, became a multi-billionaire in 2014.

Instagram

Pinterest

LinkedIn

  • Customize your background to paint a better picture of you (read more)
  • New homepage design lets you stay connected (read more)
  • LinkedIn Publishing stepped up its game (read more)
  • Who’s viewed your profile? New ways to engage (read more)
  • What’s next? Big ideas in 2015

Post, Tweet & Pin

What major social media changes in 2014 did I miss?

What 2015 update are you anticipating the most?

What’s your favorite social network now and 3 years ago?

What a year in the social media world!

Cheers,
Jaime

Stay up-to-date on the crazy social media world. Join the discussion:
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6 Valuable Snippets of Career Advice I’d Tell My Younger Self

After reading some of the entries in the popular #IfIWere22 LinkedIn series, I was inspired to think about what I would tell my younger self. Hindsight is 20/20, right? So here I go…

college graduation photo

Yours truly at 22 — ready to take on the world!

6 Snippets of Career Advice I’d Give to My Younger Self

Don’t let yourself be used. Yes, it pays to be a hard worker and to chip in where you can. Some of your best opportunities may come from projects outside of your ‘job description.’ Yet, it’s not helpful to willingly work 70-80 hours a week and become a catch can for the company while others maintain an actual work-life balance. There’s nothing in the Ten Commandments about burning out before you’re 25 and routinely doing other peoples’ jobs for them.

This point also refers to regularly ‘covering’ for co-workers or even your boss while they’re sleeping in, out socializing or living their life. In group environments, you’ll always have people riding others’ coattails. Sometimes, these people promise ‘exposure,’ promotions, even raises. Unfortunately, these are often empty promises.

Start networking now! Your professional network can be a big boost to your career, but it’s up to you to build and maintain it. I’m not just talking about collecting business cards or adding connections on LinkedIn (although that’s a great place to be!). Get to know professionals in your industry, offer your help when appropriate and pick their brain. Remember to give twice as much (of your time, talents, etc.) than you receive.

Speak up. You may be the low man (or woman) on the totem pole, but don’t hesitate to chime in when appropriate. If your boss asks your opinion, speak up. As a newbie to a company or situation, you can offer a fresh perspective that veterans cannot. Besides, the simplest solution is often the best, and others may be over-thinking the project. Your superiors will notice when you routinely offer valuable insight and fresh ideas.

Speak up -- and shine like a star!

Speak up! Your insight and ideas can be just as valuable as someone twice your age.

Learn from every opportunity. You were excited to land an internship at a great company but all you’re doing is picking up coffee, making runs to the mail room and updating endless spreadsheets. First, do whatever tasks you’re assigned to the best of your ability — even making coffee runs. If you can’t handle the routine, why would anyone give you more responsibility? Look for opportunities to improve the situation — save the company money, enhance a report or bring efficiency where you can. If your supervisor doesn’t notice, bring it up (appropriately of course). Then, ask for more. Let your boss know that you’d love to sit in the next brainstorming session or be involved in a conference strategy session, and offer your help — to take notes, order lunch, etc. It may just be that the powers to be have so much going on that they don’t realize you’re being shut out. (This applies to seemingly non-related jobs and experiences as well. You’d be surprised what you can learn from working at Walmart or helping your youth group.)

Try new things! You’re young, so it’s OK if you don’t know what you want to do for the rest of your life. This is where talking to other professionals, shadowing them and volunteering for opportunities will help. For example, volunteering at an American Diabetes Association walk may show you a love for event planning or participating in student government could spark an interest in public service. The more you experience, the more confident you’ll feel in your chosen career path. Change your mind at your first career stop? No big deal. Keep looking for what you want to do and avenues you can take to get there.

Don’t burn bridges. It may be tempting to walk out of a job on the spot or tell that professor what you really think of his teaching, but it’s probably a bad idea. We’re a mobile society today, so you never know where or when you’ll run into someone again. That professor? He may be a consultant for a company you apply at. Your internship supervisor? It turns out his brother-in-law works in HR at your dream company. It’s amazing how small the world turns out to be. So try to act professional until the end, even if that means graciously leaving an opportunity before you explode.

What’s your advice?

What career advice would you give to your younger self?

Is there a decision you made when you were younger that you love or regret?

What’s the best career advice you’ve received?

p.s. Entering the workforce? Changing careers? CCC can help you with a number of personal branding needs, including resumes, cover letters and social media profiles/usage. Learn more or contact us to discuss your needs today!

Older and wiser,
Jaime

Building your professional network? Connect with CCC!
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Are LinkedIn Groups Working For You?

The past week we’ve focused on LinkedIn, the largest professional networking site on the planet. It tends to be a platform that most people aren’t utilizing effectively, because they’ve either posted a profile years ago and haven’t been back, or they share every tweet, which is a little overboard. So far, we’ve covered general tips in LinkedIn: Are You Connected? and focused on the foundation of the site in LinkedIn: The Essence of a Profile. (Feel free to catch up on those posts if you missed them. I’ll grab a macchiato… )

Are LinkedIn groups working for you?

original photo via Esther Vargas’ photostream by CC BY-SA 2.0 // edited by CCC

Now we’re moving on to the power of groups. Are you taking advantage of this feature on LinkedIn?

Participating in groups can:

  • Increase traffic to your profile. Group participants (not just members) receive four times the number of profile views, typically from people who are interested in what you do.
  • Showcase your expertise in key industries/subjects. In our current age of information, business professionals want to be ‘thought leaders’ or experts in what they do. By commenting intelligently in group discussions, you can build your credibility and even win new business opportunities.
  • Warm up a potential customer. When you’re active in groups, you’ll begin to get to know other active members of the group: potential customers, employers, business partners, vendors, etc. You never know where this type of conversation might lead, and it makes pursuing a business relationship with these individuals a little easier.

Creating a group can:

  • Grow your business. Give customers and prospects a place to ask questions, discuss their needs and stay up-to-date on the latest news in your field. An active group is a great place to promote your business by offering value — and value brings in referrals. (If you have a company page, don’t forget to feature your group!)
  • Connect you to your audience in a safe, professional environment. Tired of Facebook’s pay-to-play movement? Not a blogger? Hosting a LinkedIn group gives you a professional forum to discuss key issues and take the pulse of your customers and prospects. What are their biggest struggles? How can you solve them? Plus, you can close the group in order to have more control over who joins (like your competitor posing as a buyer).
  • Provide content for your marketing efforts. By taking the pulse of your customers, prospects and industry professionals, you can come across some thought-provoking content ideas. Ask your audience for their opinion on a subject, take a vote and gain real insight into what your connections and followers are looking for. Providing value = more business.

Comment on This Discussion

Are you active on LinkedIn?

Which groups are your favorite? (Feel free to tell us about your own group!)

Have you secured a new client, job or business opportunity on LinkedIn?

Thanks for reading,
Jaime

Connect with CCC! We’d love to be a part of your professional network.
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LinkedIn: The Essence of a Profile

You created a bare bones profile and uploaded your resume to LinkedIn a few years ago, and you haven’t been back. You’re done, right?

LinkedIn: Essence of a Profile

original photo via smi23le’s photostream by CC BY 2.0 // edited by CCC

Similar to other social platforms, the more you put into LinkedIn, the more you’ll get out of it. And just like other platforms, it all starts with your profile. What’s in a LinkedIn profile? Let’s break it down.

(Read my) Headline

First, let’s start with what it’s not. Your headline does not have to include your title or current employer. That information is already listed elsewhere in your profile. Your headline is what you want people to think of you (and contact you) for. Are you a content marketing maestro? QuickBooks queen? WordPress whiz? Let the world know about it.

Here’s the deal with headlines: you want to come up in as many relevant searches as possible. The format is up to you. List your specialties: Writing Services | Marketing Services | Social Media Services | Content Creation or create a phrase: Writer (aka content creator, communications connoisseur) reaching consumers’ minds and pocketbooks since ’04. Spend some time playing around with your headline: tweak it, change it, have friends and colleagues read it. This is how you pull people in — or don’t.

Profile Picture

As we’ve touched on previously, it all starts with your profile picture. You need a good head shot, which is easier than ever today. It helps to show your face, so people know who you are. Remember, people do business with people, not companies. Let them know who they’ll be working with. Stay away from group shots, pictures of your kids (or other people) or anything related to a mugshot. Your personal Facebook page? Fine. Your LinkedIn profile. Not so much. Smart phone pics work fine. Just make sure you’re in good lighting, don’t have anything distracting behind you and don’t move the phone/camera. Oh, and stay away from duck lips. They may be hot, but they probably won’t help you land new clients or opportunities.

Summary

After a well thought out headline and appropriate profile pic, this is it: the most important part of your profile. Prospects, potential employers and investors will often decide whether to read on and contact you from your summary. This is your time to shine and let readers know why they should want to work with you. What can you do for them? Think of it as your elevator speech or 30-second spot to sell what you do. Always think of the reader — what do they want to know? Include any relevant statistics or numbers to back up your claims (i.e. consistent double digit growth, 25% year-over-year ROI).

Experience & Education

This is where you spell it out (briefly, of course). Tell people how you succeeded at previous opportunities, including going above and beyond. Share relevant examples, statistics, key responsibilities, numbers and any details that may impress a prospect or potential employer. Bullet points work great! Also, add projects that you worked on, including published works. (p.s. Published doesn’t have to mean The New York Times; it can be in a company newsletter or on a blog.) Don’t forget about the Education field, even if it was “forever ago.” Chances are you accomplished a few noteworthy achievements in school and should let everyone know about them: internships, awards, minors & additional areas of knowledge, overseas studies. It’s amazing what could attract someone’s eye!

Skills & Endorsements, Recommendations

These two areas can provide validation to your profile. Select the skills that you most want to be known for to display on your profile, so people you work with can endorse you for them. It’s fine to ask for endorsements or recommendations; just be tactful about it and be prepared to return the favor. Yes, that means you shouldn’t blast a recommendation request to all of your 900 connections unless you’re prepared to write 900 recommendations. Be selective about who you ask: did you provide value to a client? Did you succeed on an important project for your boss? Make sure that anyone you ask has a reason to recommend you, and being your best friend probably isn’t a legitimate reason.

There are other sections of course, and they all add value to your LinkedIn experience. But we’ve covered the “meat and potatoes,” so to speak. Go ahead, implement a few changes, and show the professional world what you’re really about!

Related reading: LinkedIn: Are You Connected | Are LinkedIn Groups Working For You?

Connect with Us

What tips do you have for LinkedIn profiles?

Share an awesome example of a LinkedIn profile or section — yours or someone else’s.

Have you landed a job, client or business opportunity via LinkedIn?

Your professional networker,
Jaime

Connect with CCC! We’d love to be a part of your professional network.
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LinkedIn: Are You Connected?

All of your colleagues and fellow business professionals keep telling you to get on LinkedIn, but you’re not looking for a job. So what’s the point, right?

LinkedIn: Are You Connected?

Wrong. LinkedIn is the Rolodex of the 21st century and so much more: an organized way to store your professional contacts, an easy way to follow up with new connections (made on or offline) and an amazing way to connect on business ventures across town and across the world.

How should you stand out on this popular networking site? It depends on your objectives, but the following tips should help you break free from your competition.

Do

  1. Be active. People tend to set up their profile and walk away. You don’t need to post as much as on other social platforms, but it is helpful to share valuable content at least a few times a week.
  2. Set up notifications. Remember that LinkedIn is a great place for new opportunities: business ventures, clients, careers, volunteering. Set up notifications, so you know when someone contacts you and can respond accordingly.
  3. Engage. Don’t just connect with people and forget about them. Cultivate your network! If you come across a resource that would benefit a connection, send it to him. Take some time — even 5 minutes twice a week — scrolling through your feed to like, comment or share on your connections’ posts. This is a helpful way to stay abreast of the latest news and stay top of mind with clients, prospects and business professionals.
  4. Help. Are you knowledgeable about the topic of a group discussion? Chime in! Do you have a solution for someone’s problem? Share! At it’s core, LinkedIn is a forum for business professionals around the world to connect, collaborate and grow.
  5.  Be selective. Some people are obsessed with having the most connections, but it’s really about quality, not quantity. Only send connection requests to people who genuinely interest you: a possible client, new connection at a conference, colleague or possible partner in a business venture, for example.

At it’s core, LinkedIn is a forum for business professionals around the world to connect, collaborate and grow.

Don’t

  1. Spam. Some people use social media like they do email marketing — to spam you with constant sales pitches, special offers and information about them. It’s OK to post this information sometimes, but remember the tried-and-true customer mantra, “What’s in it for me?” Post valuable information for your audience, and don’t feel the need to post constantly. (So please think long and hard before connecting your Twitter and LinkedIn accounts.)
  2. Spam. This isn’t just about posting updates; it’s also about sending messages and posting to groups. Don’t spam anywhere. While an effective message to new connections, old contacts or prospects can open doors, blasting people with tired sales pitches, daily specials or repeated requests for ‘favors’ can slam them shut.
  3. Always have your hand out. One of the numerous benefits of social media is the ability to connect with people from all over the world, including leaders in your industry or field. These ‘rock stars’ can be a tremendous asset to growing your network and creating opportunities. However, don’t constantly ask these folks (or anyone for that matter) for favors or hit them with a request right after connecting. They don’t like to be used either.
  4. Stalk. Just hang up the phone with the HR director at a company you’re interviewing at next week? You may want to hold off on sending a connection request. Some people aren’t comfortable connecting with prospective employees in order to avoid showing favoritism. Did you meet with a prospect for coffee? Feel free to send him a connection request with a thank you message, but don’t go overboard. Inundating him with 5 messages over the next 2 days isn’t necessary.

Enjoy these tips to enhance your LinkedIn experience, and let us if you’re able to put them to good use. Keep an eye out for additional posts in this series: LinkedIn: The Essence of a Profile and Are LinkedIn Groups Working For You? (If you have any additional requests for posts on LinkedIn, let us know!)

Connect with us:

Do you agree with the aforementioned tips? What did we miss?

Have you landed a new client, career opportunity or business venture on LinkedIn?

How do you use LinkedIn vs. other social platforms?

p.s. If you’re on the largest professional networking site in the world, connect with CCC. We’ll be happy to answer any questions or offer a few tips.

Cheers,
Jaime

Connect with CCC! We’re social creatures.
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Best Advice: Figure It Out

LinkedIn’s latest question posed to its Influencers made me think. What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? As usual, there’s some great posts worth reading, from Richard Branson’s Protect the Downside to Barry Salzberg’s Lock Your Kryptonite in a Lead Box. You can browse them all here.

LinkedIn Influencer or not, here’s my advice: figure it out. From the time I was young, I had a natural curiosity about me. I loved to understand how things work (and still do), how people accomplish things and how people come up with ideas. I didn’t just want the answer or the solution; I needed to understand how it was achieved. Maybe that innate curiosity coupled with the time and place I grew up instilled a love of figuring things out. As I’ve gone through life, I’ve discovered that this is not a common skill.

sun breaking through the trees

That ‘aha moment’ when you figure something out is an amazing feeling.

Sure, it would be great to live in a world where everything was perfectly spelled out (or upon further thought, probably not), where everything came with a set of easy-to-follow instructions that could be completed in no time at all. But life and business is rarely like that. Whether you’re an accomplished professional or fresh-out-of-college grad, there’s benefits to figuring things out, such as: 

  • You’re seen as proactive. Figuring things out generally leads to viewing situations proactively. What information might be valuable in the meeting tomorrow? What example can I cite on my conference call this afternoon? What other products or solutions may my client be interested in? Yes, it’s a little extra work, but being prepared will make you shine.
  • Your work ethic becomes famous. Hard workers are valued the world over, but especially in America. From the time our ancestors arrived, Americans have pulled themselves up by their bootstraps and made a life for themselves. A strong work ethic will still take you places.
  • People value you. When you make the extra effort to figure things out, you usually end up with information — which is valuable. You’ll soon become known as the go-to person when someone has a question or is stuck. Colleagues, business partners, bosses and clients will appreciate your usefulness and recommend you for future opportunities. Word-of-mouth is a powerful thing.
  • The company values you more. $$$ We need people of all levels and abilities, but critical thinkers and problem solvers are generally viewed as more valuable, therefore drawing more compensation. Be a person who figures things out and see your value rise.

So who passed on this valuable advice to me? Quite a few people actually, through words and deeds. My parents are big believers in kids figuring things out for themselves (unless death or destruction is imminent), so they got me started in the right direction. I was fortunate to work closely with two amazing people in my first job out of college, who baptized me in the Corporate America environment. They were always willing to answer questions or explain things, but they never sat behind me and gave me step-by-step instructions. For that, I’m grateful. Finally, I worked for (and survived a crazy culture with) a lady for 6 action-packed years, who I learned so much from. But she too gave me space to figure things out and run with them, which I will always be thankful for. 

Curiosity will not cause us to die — only lack of it will. Never to want to see the other side of the hill or that improbable country where living is an idyll (although a probable hell) would kill us all. Only the curious have, if they live, a tale worth telling at all.  -Curiosity, by Alastair Reid

I’ve tried to pass this same advice onto my employees, colleagues and even clients. Trust yourself: you do know how to do this. I’ll be happy to answer any questions you may have or show you how to do something. But there’s something about figuring things out for yourself, too. That sense of accomplishment is an amazing feeling.

(p.s. I’m NOT saying to never ask questions or request help. We all need help sometimes, whether it’s collaborating on a specific project or because our job or business becomes too overwhelming. There’s a lot of value in outsourcing tasks that fall outside of our sweet spot, so that we can focus on what we do best.) 

Speak Up

Do you prefer step-by-step instructions over figuring things out?

Is there a situation where figuring things out is actually detrimental?

Is your preference for figuring things out or being given specific, detailed instructions a generational thing?

Let’s discuss.

Still figuring out life,
Jaime

I’ve figured this out. Let’s get social!
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Social Media Savvy: It’s Still All About the Brand

One of the more popular posts I wrote last year was about social media branding and its importance to your brand’s reputation, especially if you’re in the marketing, social media, technology or related fields. After reading Dustin W. Stout’s excellent post on the subject, I realized an update was in order. The major social networks were busy editing, tweaking and re-branding in 2013.

Why does it even matter?

  • Your reputation — If your social media branding is out of date, what else is?
  • Respect — You’ve carefully cultivated your brand and want people to use it as intended. Extend that courtesy to others, including social media networks.
  • Brand police — The networks may not notice that you’re using their out-of-date branding unless you’re Coca-Cola or Apple. But remember, you are renting space on their platforms so it’s not a good idea.
spotlight shining on the major social media network logos

Your brand conveys who you are and what you’re about. Make sure to always comply with other company’s brand guidelines.

Facebook rolled out a new like button this year, but the social media giant’s main logo has remained pretty consistent. The company uses a white ‘f’ in a blue square and does not allow use of the full Facebook logo.

Google may be a brand master, but it’s social network Google+ is still figuring out which way it wants to go in that department. This platform has changed its branding every year of its short existence, and has currently settled on a centered ‘g+’ on a red background.

Twitter‘s flying high from its splashy IPO earlier this year (which has since come back to Earth), so its fresh branding with its legendary bird angled up makes sense. Stay away from the old ‘t’ or full Twitter logos, or the dreaded Fail Whale may appear.

Instagram is a new addition to this year’s post as the visual social platform has exploded over the past two years. The company has added video to its repertoire, been purchased by Facebook and moved to the web — a major reason to grab a badge and promote your account.

                 Facebook logo     Google+ logo     Twitter logo     Instagram logo     Pinterest logo     LinkedIn logo     YouTube logo

The current branding for the major social platforms is shown above. (Keep in mind that some offer additional options, depending on use.) For your convenience, I’ve linked each logo to the current branding guidelines for that social network.

Questions? Comments? We’d love to hear from you about social media brand compliance.

Is using current social media branding on your website, blog and other marketing materials important to you?

Is it as important if you’re not in a related industry?

Is there another social media network or platform you’re interested in?

Need to update your social media branding? As a special treat, Dustin has shared a downloadable file at the end of his aforementioned insightful post.

Well blog readers, it’s  been an eventful year. Thank you for reading along, joining the discussions and sharing our content to your connections. We really appreciate it, and wish everyone a happy, healthy and prosperous 2014!

Spotlight photo courtesy of Virgin Mobile’s Wallpaper Swag Gallery // Social media icons were added

Stay safe and enjoy ringing in the New Year!

Jaime

Join the conversation: 
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