Speak Up: How To Grow Your Business With Podcasts and Audio Assets

We’re excited to welcome Sue-Ann Bubacz, host of the MIX/SIZZLE & SHAKE YOUR BUSINESS Podcast, as a guest contributor to the CCC blog!

Having a podcast for your business allows you to reach out to people on a different level. Podcasts help humanize your company, adding brand flavor while amplifying your voice. 

Like other forms of content, the podcasts you produce, publish, and share are an opportunity to: 

Most importantly, you can communicate candidly and directly with people through your podcast. A podcast allows people access to your business’s core values and gives a glimpse into its personality. 

Plus, go ahead and showcase thought leadership while helping listeners with information and resources. Sharing a mix of what you know and what you are learning means you have an eternal field of possible topics to explore. 

Podcasts help humanize your company, adding brand flavor while amplifying your voice. 

Create Awareness

Awareness of your business happens in phases when you add an audio component to your digital content mix. These phases represent a path to gain awareness and attention for your business. And by creating valuable audio content touchpoints for new audiences, you increase your content reach and drive newly engaged traffic to your website.

Remember as you go, however, all roads are geared to make deeper connections between your business and potential customers. 

Working the awareness stage with your audio content is as simple as recording quick audio clips. Create mini audio content campaigns to introduce content to invite people to check out your newest blog posts, for example, or promote an upcoming event. 

Borrow immediate content by using your existing written content repurposed into audio episodes. Or, create batches of episodes around one or more of the core topics pertaining to your business. Further, answering most-asked questions around your business makes a good starter series to quickly get your audio message off the ground. 

Using the content suggestions above on your way to creating awareness allows you to understand yourself, too. Pinpointing your business focus to produce the appropriate podcast content helps you gain insight into developing a more advanced audio strategy. 

And, you can start now. 

By creating valuable audio content touchpoints for new audiences, you increase your content reach and drive newly engaged traffic to your website.

Platforms like anchor.fm are user-oriented and more straightforward than you imagine. I love the Anchor App and have been introducing it as a free-to-use solution to many businesses and bloggers over the years. Try it out to experiment and dip your feet into podcasting to see if it’s a good fit before investing more.

For more advanced solutions, Spotify is growing in terms of user size and services. In fact, it is now the parent company of Anchor. 


The most established and highly recommended professional audio platform is Libsyn.

Reach New Audiences

However, there are many platforms to select from, and they offer a plethora of options for services. 

Notably, most platforms connect your podcast feed to the likes of Apple Podcasts* and Google Play, along with a slew of others. The availability of this RSS feed sharing system gives you a big step up for reaching new listeners. Again, like most content assets you create, gaining reach and finding new audiences through awareness requires amplification and distribution. (*Note: this is currently changing with Anchor and will be up to you to set this up for yourself.

So, in addition to getting reach via these podcasting platforms, implement a social media marketing component into your audio strategy. Listeners turn into followers, and followers turn into sales. 

You can also work on reach by promoting your shows, paying close attention to creating enticing titles and descriptions, for example. And don’t forget to promote to your email list, letting people know when a new episode is published. 

Further, collaboration offers a chance to reach new audiences simply by “borrowing” them from your collaborators. Of course, at the same time, you share your audience right back. As an added bonus, you get to meet and make new friends and business connections in the process. 

Networking is always part of meeting new people and making business connections. Your podcast is another doorway to networking. Plus, audience reach grows when you interact with listeners. Make sure to reply to comments and thank people who share your podcasts on social. 

Because podcast listeners enjoy the ability to listen on their terms—anytime and anywhere they like—audio content is one of the most user-friendly types of media. On top of that, podcast listenership continues to grow, as illustrated in the infographic below by musinoomph.com.

Podcast Statistics Infographic by MusicOomph.com

Infographic by: MusicOomph.com

Stand Out in Your Field or Community 

One way to stand out in your field is to interview interesting people for your podcast; select guests to talk about your key topics or topics related to what you do. Try to find guests offering new information or a unique spin to add to the discussion. Remember, it’s all about your audience, so it doesn’t hurt if you find guests with a bit of sparkling personality to go along with the first-rate info.

If you want to stand out in your local community, pair up your content with local happenings. Get creative and discover cross-over subject matter to enrich content, and participate in local events. Cross-promotions are often good business drivers, and the addition of an audio asset gives you a new level of reach. 

Think about a way to “go live” with your podcast and involve your customers in some way, or interview people attending a local event giving you networking opportunities onsite and off. Invite your neighborhood businesses to your podcast to talk about what they do or how you work together. Maybe each one can share their history of operating in the local community. 

The more visible you are in a community, and the more you are willing to network and promote, the more people get to know you and want to do business with you. Your podcast is a great talking point and a way to invite collaborators into your community.

Your podcast is a great talking point and a way to invite collaborators into your community.

Increase Reputation and Build Authority

When you’re the one initiating things and stirring up interest, promoting others, and staying visible, your reputation and authority grow. People look to you to participate, solve problems, and come up with new ideas. Helping in this way works in the digital space as well as in your local community. 

Keeping your word and acting on it proves you’re honest and reliable, a trusted business member and resource, solidifying your reputation, and continuing to grow your authority. Just remember, everything you do in business reflects on you and your reputation and builds (or destroys) trustworthiness. 

Podcasting helps you show people who you are as a business—your core values, company culture, and attitudes toward business—and listeners get to know you and learn your beliefs about doing good business.

Establish and Grow Credibility in Your Industry

Another part of growing your authority is also the key to gaining credibility. And the question is, of course, do you know your stuff? Not only is it great to be a go-to resource in your community, but you also need to go a step further and prove you’re the best-in-the-business for whatever it is you do! 

Taking your credibility higher in your industry requires you to stay updated and on top of exciting new developments and any changes. Go ahead and take a leadership role working towards innovation while staying on the cutting-edge. You can’t rest on your laurels as you strive to improve continually. I want to be the best in the world at whatever I am doing, so I just keep striving to improve. For business purposes, this attitude works, helping to propel you forward. 

Psst, this article is starting to feel like a podcast! 

Growing your credibility means finding teachable moments all around you and applying them to developing thoughtful and high-quality content for podcasting. The best kind of credibility comes after you are a proven entity backed by successes, wins and happy customers galore. You’ll know when you’ve built credibility from your podcast and your actions when customers refer business to you. The goal is to never have to sell again. How? By consistently receiving referrals because you’re already in demand! 

Yes, your podcast is part of your content and inbound marketing plan. 

Repurpose Top Content to Communicate Your Core Values

The core values you provide in business need to be a common thread skillfully woven throughout your communications consistently. On top of that, your business needs to offer multiple touchpoints for people to notice you, and repurposing your content does the trick.

Repurposing allows you to share the same or similar content via various formats to satisfy the different ways people like to consume content. Soooo repurposing content helps you extend content to new audiences while allowing you to communicate a message in more than one way.

Repurposing content helps you extend content to new audiences while allowing you to communicate a message in more than one way.

Initiate New Relationships and Nurture Your Community Towards Sales

There’s no doubt, creating and maintaining good business relationships lead to sales and growth for your business. But building and fostering those relationships starts with connecting with the people who are interested in your services. It’s about reaching people who resonate with your core communications and need precisely the things you do. 

Podcasting is a content and media form consumers enjoy and, at the same time, cuts layers away from nurturing the know/like/trust formula over time. Lending an actual voice to your content gives you a shortcut to impact your audience. Allowing listener input for show topics offers you another opportunity to shorten connection time and build genuine relationships. 

Like all marketing now, two-way communications rule. Listening to and including the people you interact with or who interact with your audio content matters. You’ll find podcasting interactions organically spread across your channels, so engaging with comments, shares, and feedback is vital to your growth. Although you may think of audio as a one-to-many format, it’s the one-to-one interactions that help you grow your brand and reputation.  

Produce Unique, Creative Audio Content in Simpler or Complex Varieties

Everyone likes to talk about short attention spans. Instead, why not focus on producing valuable content assets spotlighting important information, updates, tips, and more that clients need to know. You see, people have selective attention spans and all you need to do is captivate them with your sparkling audio content. Therefore, the message—and not its length—is what makes a difference and where your best efforts belong. Of course, that’s easier said than done, right? 

As I mentioned earlier, there’re a lot of ways to get started quickly for producing valuable audio content. Still, making some decisions in advance helps to clarify what you want to communicate and how, who it’s for, and more. Naming, branding, tagline, and design considerations including logo, colors, and thumbnails are items to pre-plan for a smoother start. 

But the richness in your audio productions lies in the content you create. Its uniqueness, relevance, point-of-view, and helpfulness are all factors, among others. Delivering audio clearly is the most important measure for your listeners, so focus on the quality of your sound first. But after you master the technical component for quality sound and have the administrative and overarching show theme design in place, your original content takes center stage. 

Remember, the content you create remains in the spotlight for successful podcasting. However, just as you recreate written and other content forms into audio presentations, audio content easily transforms into written content for blog posts, guest posts, and web copy, for example. How-to’s, product reviews, and adding your two cents to trending topics work for on-the-fly audio subjects that reboot well in other formats to repurpose and extend visibility for audio.

The ability to reach new or extended audiences, increase visibility, awareness, traffic, and most importantly, to directly connect with people, makes audio content attractive. Ready to podcast? 

The ability to reach new or extended audiences, increase visibility, awareness, traffic, and most importantly, to directly connect with people, makes audio content attractive. Ready to podcast? 

Sound Off

What do you think? Are you ready to podcast? Already host a podcast? Drop your feedback, questions or podcast link(s) in the comments below, or share your thoughts with us on social! (Sue-Ann’s social media links are below.)

Sue-Ann Bubacz

Write Mix for Business

Content Creator for Business

Podcast: MIX/SIZZLE & SHAKE YOUR BUSINESS

Connect with Sue-Ann

Writing (& More) for Small Businesses Delivers Big Opportunities

I’ve always loved to write.

While most kids were playing with blocks or dolls, I was publishing magazines or newspapers with feature articles, ads, sports box scores and all.

In college, I majored in Journalism and Mass Communication, but I took every writing class I could—business writing, media writing, creative writing, copywriting. I wanted to be well versed in nearly any writing discipline, so I could pursue numerous avenues in my career.

I Jumped at Every Opportunity to Write

As I started my career, I jumped at the opportunity to handle any writing opportunity. While I was pursuing my love of writing, I was also gaining more attention at work and building my portfolio (unknowingly at first).

Before long I was ghost writing for my manager and members of our executive team. As I continued to write, I developed a reputation throughout our company (a $350 million company with around 115 employees) as a go-to writer and editor. Eventually, I was published under my own byline in our company newsletter, which was a thrill.

You Can Pick Up a Lot By Asking Questions and Listening

As my career progressed, I started to think about my future. What did I want out of my career? A corner office and impressive title? Or something else?

I worked at the corporate headquarters of a franchising company, so my job involved interacting with and supporting small business owners around North America.

Every day, I was learning more about running a business, even subconsciously. I’m naturally curious, so I would ask questions while communicating with our franchise owners. People like to talk, especially about themselves, their businesses, and their accomplishments, so you can pick up a lot by paying attention, asking questions and listening.

Guess Who Some of My First Clients Were?

While I was helping our owners, I noticed some of them were looking for affordable marketing and writing services beyond what our company offered. They knew they needed help in these areas but couldn’t afford to hire large marketing agencies.

After nine years of honing my skills and building a professional network in corporate America, I left that company and struck out on my own. Guess who some of my first clients were? The same people I had been helping.

Starting My Own Business Seemed Like a Crazy Dream

While it was a long road, the idea to start my own business came during an aha moment 15 years in the making. (I realized I wanted to write for a living while I was in high school, although I couldn’t see myself—a country kid from an unincorporated village—as a writer.)

One day at work, I realized that so many small business owners don’t know how to market themselves and couldn’t afford traditional agency fees. With my diverse background in marketing, I could start a business offering professional marketing services and experience at affordable rates.

I could give brands a voice via marketing, writing and social media services, so business owners could focus on the reason they’re in business, and not struggle with marketing decisions, writing copy and developing social media strategies.

After I realized I could start my own business, it still seemed like a crazy dream. But I did start thinking about it a lot. The next day, I began thinking about business names and what would make my business unique. The more I thought about it and talked about it, the more it became a real possibility.

At a company event, I finally made the decision: I had to go out on my own. A year later, I left and never looked back. On May 15, 2012, Clearly Conveyed Communications (CCC) was born.

You Learn a Lot About Running a Business When You Jump Out On Your Own

When I started my business, I never dreamed of today—eight years down the road. I was just trying to get through each day. Eight years later, I’m still trying to get through each day, but I can’t imagine doing anything else.

You learn so much about running a business when you jump out on your own. (I know I did!) As much as I researched and planned (and you should research and plan), at some point you have to jump in and learn as you go. (Here’s some lessons we’ve learned over the years.)

To get started, I focused on the professional network I had spent the previous nine years building. I reached out to contacts I had made and relationships I had built over time to let them know I was in business. Not only were these people potential customers, but they were also connectors.

In addition, I worked out an extensive transition plan with my former employer. It helped them maintain their services as we hired and trained my replacement, and they were my first paying client. It was nice to have income as I was building my business and looking for more clients.

I Didn’t Foresee that Businesses Would Want to Outsource Their Social Media Management

While I planned on starting a marketing company that focused heavily on writing services, I didn’t foresee the interest in businesses outsourcing their social media management. I started receiving so much interest in this area that I added a new page to my website.

Today, social media management and content creation is a significant part of my business. In turn, they’ve led to additional writing opportunities.

Offering an array of services as a marketing company allows me to present a full-service front to my audience.

The inaugural Tweetup we organized for the firefighters.

For example: We partnered with a fellow marketing company, owned by a volunteer firefighter, to handle FDIC’s (Fire Department Instructors Conference) social media for six years. (See picture above.) We developed a year round social media presence for them, so firefighters could connect, learn and train virtually, too.

A Trend in Content Marketing: Long-Form Content

While my company creates a variety of content, we’ve noticed a trend in content marketing for long-form content, and we’ve jumped on it. It seems counterintuitive to our short attention spans and the constant state of information overload we live in today. However, quality long-form content performs well online, draws traffic and gives you a lot of content to repurpose.

The key is to make it readable (and skimmable) with appropriate visuals, short paragraphs and different sections, or headings. White space and proper formatting are your friends on screen.

SEO is important, but remember to write for people, not search engines, because they’re the ones actually reading it. You can still include keywords and appropriate tags and code while making your writing readable—by humans.

While we enjoy creating long-form content, CCC pursues all types of project-based work and programs. For example, we love writing all the copy for a new website or managing a company’s entire social media presence (as opposed to only creating content). These projects and programs pay more, so we can devote the time and resources to producing our best work. They’re also easier to schedule in advance, so we can utilize our time as effectively as possible.

Putting Our Clients First Helps Us Grow Our Business

Having said that, we will take on small programs, including minor content editing and distribution, or some one-off projects, to make more contacts and build more relationships.

Doing good work for people and helping them with their needs, however minor, can result in referrals.

We’ve been fortunate to be referred several times, resulting in new customers and opportunities.

That’s why we always put current clients first. It may seem better to focus more on business development, because small business owners usually don’t have the resources to wait for new customers.

However, we’ve found that by putting current clients first, we’re their first call—for any marketing activity. As we continue to help them with their needs, they continue to come back and refer us to their clients, business associates and friends.

In fact, we work with some businesses through our clients. They can expand the services they offer without hiring full-time employees or making a significant investment.

For example, a company who sells branded merchandise and printing services can add writing, social media and additional marketing services to their service offering to truly become a full-service marketing agency. As long as we work closely together, it’s a win for all three companies—CCC, our client and our client’s client.

Marketing: What to Consider Before Expanding Social Media Platforms

How do we market our marketing and writing services? We practice what we preach—although sometimes we’re a little slow to take our own advice.

We always advise clients to consider their resources before jumping into social media. It takes time and dedication to build an active, engaged community on a social platform. You don’t need to be on every social platform available or jump on the latest trend.

While social platforms all have their own strengths, they tend to copy each other. Has a new platform grabbed your attention? What features do you like? Wait a minute, and they may appear on a platform where you already have an engaged community.

For example, Snapchat become a darling in the social media world, and then Instagram (and later Facebook) added ephemeral content, or Stories. TikTok has exploded in popularity over the past year, but Instagram has recently announced that it’s rolling out a new TikTok-like feature, Reels, to new markets and expanding its capabilities.

This feature isn’t available in the U.S. yet, but we’ll probably see it eventually. There may be reasons you want to expand to new social platforms, but think about it first and make sure you have a strategy.

When CCC started, we jumped on numerous social media platforms and overextended our resources. Slowly, we reassessed and cut back to where we are today. That has allowed us to focus more on original content creation and distribution for ourselves instead of mainly curation.

Curation is important, because it introduces you to new people and delivers a wider range of voices to your social media communities. However, original content will help you stand out and bring on new clients.

Why Writers Should Have a Blog

If you’re a writer, you probably have a blog, or at least you should. Your blog serves as a place to showcase your writing, and it can lead to partnerships or business opportunities.

Try to set up a consistent publishing schedule based on when the most readers are stopping by your blog. While it’s important to be active, only commit to what you can do. If you’re on your own and spend a lot of time on client work, then you may only be able to publish once a week or twice a month. Don’t try to publish too often for the sake of publishing; your content will likely suffer.

House your blog on your website. It will be easy for your readers to learn more about your services, and your fresh blog content will help optimize your site’s search performance. While I’m not a big fan of consistently removing content (which is a trend today), updating older content helps boost your blog’s performance. Fix any broken links or missing videos you come across, and add any relevant, new information on the post topic to inform your readers.

Don’t Publish Your Content and Wait for People to Find It

Producing quality blog content can be time-consuming, but there’s even more work ahead after you publish. Distributing your content is important, so it’s seen by a larger number of potential readers.

Don’t publish content and wait for people to find it. You have to actively and consistently promote your content, because there’s such an overload of content today.

Don’t just blast your content across various social platforms in one format at the same time. Share each article in a format best suited for each platform. Repurpose your content so you get as much mileage as possible out of it.

Write a long-form article? Share bite-sized tidbits on Twitter, each time driving more traffic back to your article.

Record a video sharing highlights of the article, and post it on your LinkedIn profile or Page.

Share your article as a link preview post to your Facebook Page or group.

Share behind-the-scenes content while you’re writing to tease a new blog article in your Stories and to let your audience know when it will publish.

Content is king, but distribution is queen—and she rules the roost.

Meet Your Readers Where They Are

Some readers will prefer to read your content on these distribution channels instead of subscribing to your blog. We’re living in the age of assistance, so you need to meet people in the moment—where they are.

Building active, engaged communities on social media takes time, but these communities are full of potential readers and people who will share your work.

Use your social presences to interact with your audience and request their feedback. Instagram Stories has numerous stickers you can use to interact, while Twitter offers polls and the ability to have conversations with people around the world.

Facebook Groups have become increasingly popular, as you can offer a smaller part of your community first access to your projects, advice in a specific area (i.e. non-fiction writing tips) or a community of peers for fellow writers to bounce ideas off of. Depending on how you utilize Facebook Groups, you may be able to monetize them.

While CCC receives most of our work through referrals, social media and content creation are crucial in our marketing efforts. Even when you are referred for an opportunity, people will often look you up online first.

Do you have a strong presence on LinkedIn? Is your website up-to-date? What comes up when people Google you? Make sure you have a strong digital presence, so people actually contact you when you are referred to them.

What To Do When Your Writing Business Slows Down

If business has slowed down, spend more time creating and distributing content. Be even more active in your social media communities and work on growing them. Genuinely engaging with others will help you grow your community and may lead to new opportunities.

One of our larger clients watched our social efforts for some time before reaching out to us. Everything you do online is visible, so make sure you’re being your best self. Setting aside 10-15 minutes per day on a platform, including reading and commenting on other blogs, will help you make new connections and grow your communities.

We’ve had success utilizing these tactics, even though they take time. Social media is a long-term game; don’t expect success overnight. Instead of trying to create content that will go viral, focus on building and delivering value to your audience one day at a time.

This year, we’ve focused on creating more original content and distributing it more. By cutting back our overall social presence, we have more time to focus on our current communities and how we can help them.

By doing so, we’ve landed a few new, smaller clients. We’re excited to continue helping them, so we can grow these accounts into larger ones. You never know where an account or new opportunity might lead.

How Writers Can Expand Their Services

Speaking of opportunities, expanding your services or collaborating with fellow writers, editors and marketing agencies (or even fellow small or local businesses) can help you grow your business as well.

Are there additional services you can offer that make sense with your current business? Or maybe you already offer them, but people don’t realize that you do. If you see a trend in your industry or notice interest in a particular service, highlight it on your website and social channels.

Working with other companies who complement your services can help you land larger clients and opportunities. If you write copy for the web, look for a designer to partner with so you can offer complete website solutions.

Or look for companies that you can refer your clients to for related services, so they always come to you first. Building relationships with fellow business professionals and owners will make them more comfortable referring business to you, too.

This has been a stressful and trying year, so we hope everyone is pulling through it as well as you can. It may be the time to try a new idea, launch a related service or partner with another company. We wish everyone the best of luck moving forward in 2020 and beyond.

* * *

A version of this post was first published on WriterCEO.com. Thank you to Colleen M. Story for sharing our writing and marketing tips!

How to Create Content that Works [Twitter Chat Recap]

Creating Content that Works Twitter Chat

Recently, I joined the #VCBuzz Twitter chat to drive a conversation on Creating Content that Works. What an insightful discussion!


“Creating content just for the sake of creating content is the strategy that is doomed to failure. “

ViralContentBee, #VCBuzz Twitter Chat

The 45-minute discussion on content creation and content marketing sizzled with smart advice from a variety of digital marketing professionals.

Gail Gardner, founder of GrowMap.com, delivered outstanding advice right off the bat. Always focus on creating quality content tailored to your target audience’s interests. You should only produce enough content that allows you to maintain a high level of quality and personalization. Remember, quality beats quantity every time.

Gail also mentions interacting with other content. This is so important! You’ll build relationships with fellow professionals in your field and drive engagement on your own content when you share it. Remember to share outside content at least 80% of the time and your own content only 20% of the time. Adhering to this best practice will help you curate a mix of view points on topics relevant to your audience and keep your feed fresh.

“Promoting your content is just as important as creating it. You need a content distribution plan as part of your overall content marketing strategy. “

What are your business goals in 2019?

Aligning Your Content Marketing to Your Business Goals

Meanwhile, Goldie Chan, a LinkedIn Top Voice and personal branding strategist, brought up a great point: your content marketing efforts should be aligned with your business goals. How do you measure its effectiveness? Engagement, engagement, engagement. Keep in mind your engagement should reflect the types of Calls-to-Action (CTAs) you extend to your audience. Do you want visitors to click through to a landing page to claim a special offer? Or do you want readers to message you on Facebook to schedule a free demo? In the first example, your goal should be to drive interested traffic to your landing page while the second would be to move prospects and customers into the privacy of Messenger.

Eventually, we moved into the future of content marketing. Where are we heading?

The Future of Content Marketing

Chat participants gave insightful answers based on their experiences and expertise, including Lisa Shomo, a marketing professional who specializes in customer marketing, growth and retention.

Review the entire Creating Content that Works chat, and join future #VCBuzz marketing Twitter chats on Tuesdays at Noon EST.

Tweet Us (Or Leave Your Feedback in the Comments)

How do you measure your content marketing efforts? What metrics are important to your brand or business?

What are your favorite examples of content marketing that achieved results?

Where do you see content marketing heading in the future?

CCC’s Chief Content Marketing Officer,
Jaime

Social Media Isn’t Easy: 5 Reasons Why It’s Worth It

Last week, we reminded everyone that social media isn’t free and recommended five ways to maximize your time and money. This week, we’re addressing another misperception.

How to become a SocialMedia Manager by Urs Steiner via CC BY 2.0

How to become a SocialMedia Manager by Urs Steiner via CC BY 2.0

 

Social media isn’t easy, but it’s worth it. We’re not talking about the act of tweeting itself or posting pictures of your kids on Facebook or Instagramming every meal you eat.

We’re talking about getting social for business, engaging your brand’s communities and developing long-term emotional connections. In other words, creating fans for life.

Related Reading: How Long Does It Take for Social Media Marketing to Start Paying Off?

Here’s 5 reasons why social media is worth it for your business:

  • Find New (Targeted) Customers: In a sea of 2.03 billion social media users*, someone is interested in your products or services. Find the right audience by utilizing hashtags, groups and platforms they’re using.
  • Delight Current Customers: 65% of customers leave over a single poor customer service experience.* Delight your current customers by providing amazing service via social media and beyond.
  • Participate in the Conversation: Customers will talk about you online and share their experiences with others. While you can’t control the conversation,  you can participate and give fans a firsthand account of what’s going on at your company.
  • Deliver Content Straight to Your Fans: 61% of people are more likely to buy from a company that delivers content.* Deliver value to your fans by creating content they love, and you’ll have a better chance of converting them into customers.
  • Turn Fans into Fanatics: Consider this: 53% of people who follow brands on social media are more loyal.* After converting fans into customers, make them fanatics for your brand by delighting them every step of the way. They’ll become your best advertising!

As we said before, social media isn’t easy, but it’s worth it if you do it right. Just remember that it’s a long-term addition to your marketing mix, not an overnight savior for your sales.

If you need help with your social media efforts, from strategy to management, we’d love to chat. There’s nothing that we love more than brands getting social — and getting it right.

Get Social on Social Media

Why is social media worth it for your brand or business?

How much time do you spend on social in a typical week?

Do you have a documented strategy?

What’s your brand’s favorite social media experience so far?

*Statistics via The Inbound Marketing Checklist: 21 Strategies for Growth

Let’s get social,
Jaime

Let’s chat (about social media, strategy or otherwise):
Facebook logo Twitter logo Instagram logo Pinterest logo LinkedIn logo

Link Building to Success: Optimize Your Website

This is the third post in a 4-part series highlighting steps you can take to improve your website’s search engine optimization (SEO). This guide was written by Ramya Raju, an experienced freelance web design writer from India. If you missed part one or two, we’d recommend reviewing them first.

While reading the first two parts of this series, you were probably wondering when I’d get to link building.

chain links

Link building is without a doubt one of the most discussed topics in SEO today. The idea is that your website is linked to by other websites and blogs, which helps in building higher rankings for your website for specific keywords. By using keyword anchor text, your site will get ranked for that particular keyword. For example, Adobe Reader is ranked number one for ‘click here’ anchor text because most download links for the reader shared on different websites are labeled with these keywords.

There are a few ways in which link building can be performed.

  • Organic Linking – the best way to gain rankings is through organic links. Such links are generated without you putting in any effort, and if they come from sites with higher rankings, like media websites and well recognized ones, then there is nothing better for your website’s SEO.
  • White Hat – quality link building efforts that follow search engines’ policies and still focus on your human audience. For example, only link to quality content when it fits within the context of your post. Don’t spam your audience (or someone else’s) with unnecessary, broken or unhelpful links that don’t contribute to the discussion.
  • Black Hat – the wrong way of link building that involves spamming and low quality back links, which should be completely avoided. It can lead to penalization by search engines and actually damage your SEO efforts.

Getting other websites and blogs to organically link to you is tough. It takes time and effort for your site to become popular enough to draw the required attention. That’s the reason why link building is an art and building quality links has to be planned well. The following methods will help you receive quality, organic links from outside sites:

  • Submit blog posts as a guest writer on the most notable blogs pertaining to your industry. These blogs will allow you to link back to your site in the author box.
  • Partner with related businesses that have their own websites and try to get a link back from their pages for partners, vendors, suppliers, etc.
  • To generate better incoming traffic to your website, create local search and social media profiles. The direct effect of these profiles on your search engine rankings is debatable but they will help drive more traffic to your website (which in turn will boost your SEO efforts).
  • Buy advertising space and/or submit your website links to dedicated industry directories and online trade journals. Don’t submit links or purchase ad space on low quality websites that are unrelated to your website (even if it’s free to do so).
  • Publish content which is so rich that people share it on their sites and blogs, providing you with useful back links. Infographics are an example of content that is typically shared at a high rate.

Photo: “Chain Links” by Eric Martin / CC BY 2.0

We hope you’ve enjoyed the first three parts of this 4-part series on search engine optimization. Check back next Thursday for part 4, Using Google+ to Boost Your Search Engine Rankings. As a reminder, posts are published on the CCC  blog every Tuesday and Thursday. Thanks for stopping by!

Ramya RajuRamya Raju is a freelance web design writer with 8 years of extensive blogging experience on a variety of online publishing and social media platforms. She generally writes high quality articles on travel, photography, SEO, web design, English courses and other general topics as requested. Ramya, an extrovert with a passion for photography and anthropology, enjoys travelling to different countries to discover new cultures and experience life with the locals. You can reach her at ramyaraju896@gmail.com or visit her online at http://www.colorcharacter.com/uk/.